Welcome to the Venice Travel Blog

Cheryl Imboden with Venice map
Venice Travel Blog is an extension of our travel-planning Web site, Venice for Visitors, which PC Magazine has called "the premier visitors' site for Venice, Italy." We hope you'll visit often, and we invite you to post your comments about traveling or living in Venice. If you're fond of animals, take a look at our dog blog, Maggie in Venice: A Bearded Collie's Adventures in Italy.

Finally, if you're traveling to Venice for the first time, don't miss our "Introducing Venice" article at Veniceforvisitors.com.

- Durant and Cheryl Imboden

"Venice Secrets" exhibition covers the darker side of Venetian history

  Venice Secrets banner

ABOVE: The history of Venice (like the history of humanity in general) isn't always pretty, and Venice Secrets will show you how the Venetian Republic "applied justice, in a severe manner with certain and sometimes cruel punishments."

From March 31 through May 1, 2018, a major exhibition titled Venice Secrets will allow locals and visitors "to get to know the cruellest and gory side of the Venetian Republic" over the centuries.

The official press release states:

"On 31 March 2018, Palazzo Zaguri opens the “Venice Secrets, Crime and Justice” exhibition to the public.

"An exhibition which recounts the history of Venice through torture, death penalty and inquisition themes, with unique items and suggestive reconstructions, debunking myths and false myths about one of the most long-lived historical realities within the European scenario.

"The display circuit, structured in four sections and 36 showcasing rooms (first section: Justice and torture; second section: Prisons and prisoners; third section: The capital executions rite; fourth section: Inquisition and Holy Office), offers the opportunity of viewing hundreds of torture instruments and over 60 original documents exhibited to the world for the first time, talking of a dark Venice and its dramas, such as the case of Doge Francesco Foscari, the tragic end of Carmagnola and Giacomo Casanova’s prison stint.

"Each showcase room features the narration of a story, but also of the secrets of the magistrate benches which made up the structure of the State. Ample space is dedicated to the Holy Office through several examples, from the clash between the Republic of Venice and the Holy See, to the figures of Giordano Bruno and Paolo Sarpi."

Admission prices are:

  • Adult €16€
  • Disabled persons, students, teachers, over 65, child 6-14, €12
  • Child under 6 or disabled person's assistant, free
  • Group €12 per person (minimum 10 people)

For more information, including directions and a map to the Palazzo Zaguri, see the Venice Secrets Crime & Justice Exhibition Web site at venicesecrets.net.

BELOW: The Venice Secrets exhibition is in the Palazzo Zaguri on the Campo San Maurizio, within walking distance of the Piazza San Marco.


Images courtesy of Venice Secrets Crime & Justice Exhibition.

Ingo Bollhöfer captures Venice in color and B&W photos

Venice seagull photo
ABOVE: Ingo Bollhöfer caught a seagull in flight with a water taxi, a vaporetto station, and Venice's Dogana di Mare in the background.

By day,  Ingo Bollhöfer is the managing director of a German software firm. In his off-hours, he takes pictures--including images of Venice, which he's been visiting since 2004. He recently shared a portfolio of his color and monochrome photos with us, and we think they're fantastic.

We've reproduced a handful of images from Herr Bollhöfer's portfolio here. To see more, click the link at the end of this post.

Dog in Venice photo

ABOVE: A dog takes a break outside a pizza and kebab shop.

Pigeon man and pigeons in Venice

ABOVE: A pigeon whisperer communes with a flock of feathered friends.

photographers in Venice photo

ABOVE: You're never too young to enjoy photography in Venice.

To see more images from Ingo Bollhöfer's portfolio, visit Inspire & Connect: Venice.

Images copyright © Ingo Bollhöfer.
All rights reserved. (Used by permission.)


Venice trades showers for toilets

Comune di Venezia - Docce Pubbliche photo

Venetians and Venetophiles often wax nostalgic about the days when central Venice had more than 150,000 residents. (Since World War II, the centro storico's population has dropped to about 58,000.) They conveniently forget how many of those old-time Venetians lived in overcrowded apartments without modern conveniences.

In the photo above, you can see the entrance to municipal showers in the city center where poorer Venetians once went to bathe. Today, the showers are gone, having been replaced by public toilets.

The toilets are expensive--1,50 euros for tourists, less for locals--so it shouldn't be surprising that some visitors and residents whiz directly into canals. (And why not, you may ask, since most of Venice's raw sewage is flushed into the canals anyway?) This is not a good idea, especially if you've been drinking, since tipsy tinklers have been known to slip, fall into canals, and drown. We once saw a body floating in a canal near our apartment in San Polo the morning after Martedi Grasso, or "Fat Tuesday," when boozing and canalside urination are rampant.